Dream Big! Updated

 

I’ve been dreaming big  for some time and now my dream has come true!

 

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My new Brother Dream Machine.  The hoop is filled with one of many built in Zundt designs.

 

The Dream Machine by Brother has me filled with awe.  The engineers who think up and design all these feature sare like Disney’s Imaginators.  They bring to life fantasies most have not yet imagined.  Just look at this video!

 

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I can hardly stand my excitement for this machine and have spent considerable time playing with it this past week.  The project in the hoop above will be a companion pillow to this one,  made in such a fit of enthusiasm that I forgot to taper the corners.  The Zundt design is 7.4 x 13.6″ and stitches beautifully.

 

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And it is overstuffed.  The next one will be better.

Every time I get a new sewing machine, I am  thrilled with its capabilities.  Each one seems to have reached the pinnacle of performance.  And yet, the next one out shines the previous model.

So often I am reminded of a statement made in a 1910 Singer publication that detailed the history of the sewing machine.  Sadly, I’ve lost the booklet, but the essence of the comment was that their newest machine was now perfected and nothing more could ever be wished for or added to future machines.  Humph!

I love this quote:

Think bigdream big, believe big, and the results
will be big.

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Sonia Showalter’s framed embroidery says it all. The “D” is from her spectacular new Citadel alphabet which offers a free letter until the next is released. So hop over  to check it out. The lower case letters are from her Fairy Tale Alphabet.  I’ve just purchased the lowercase alphabet so I can make one just like this for my granddaughter’s upcoming birthday.

 

It’s getting crowded in my sewing room.  Each machine is like an old friend which makes selling it too hard.  As a matter of fact, I’ve just recently posted for sale my first top-of-the-line machine, a 1984 Bernina 930.  But 3 of my other “new” machines are stitching most of the time, busily embroidering or sewing.

Two older embroidery combo machines have been moved into my “loaner program.”  They are fostered by responsible, interested friends who agree to use and maintain the machine for a period of 6 months.    At the end of that time, most have invested their own embroidery machines.  It gives me a lot of satisfaction to introduce my friends to the joy of machine embroidery and sewing.

What do you do with your old machines?  I’d really like to know.

 

 

6 responses to “Dream Big! Updated

  1. What a beauty! I’m sure you will keep it busy for many, many hours. Believe it or not, I only have three machines, not counting my mom’s old Singer which someday I may have renovated. I’m a Viking girl, with a Husqvarna Viking Designer Diamond Royale in my Colorado apartment and an old Designer 1 (with floppy disk) still sitting in my California home. I also keep a limited edition HV Tulip (I think) at my daughter’s house. She doesn’t use it, so I consider it mine. When I buy a new machine, I try to trade on in, just to keep the inventory down. I have a friend who has seven (!) machines.

  2. Cynthia, it sounds like you have equipment for sewing wherever you are! My old Bernina 930 was at my daughter’s home (for my use) until the children came along. She said she needed the closet space. Now they have moved to a larger home so maybe I should load up that machine and take it back. That would be so convenient. Thanks for reminding me of this option.

  3. Shirley Boyken

    Good for you, Janice. I wondered how long you could hold out before you would own a Dream Machine too! In a weak moment I traded in my Quattro but then found out that there are designs on that one that are not duplicated on other machines. Should have saved them..:( But I still have my Quattro 2 that is going to the lake with me. You will do wonders with this new machine. The learning curve is rather steep but worth every minute spent studying and “playing”. It is a true wonder and marvel!!!! Congratulations!

  4. Shirley, I guess you can tell how thrilled I am with this new machine, probably as thrilled as you are with yours. Are the designs on the original Quattro different from the Quattro 2? Cam you get them from there? All day today I was in a wonderful class which dealt with the scanning mat, reverse applique and bobbin work. So much to learn but it’s all sooooo fabulous! I have another class next week and can hardly wait. Have you taken any classes? Can you get any when you go to Minnesota?

  5. Janice, love popping in to your site when time allows. I just got the new
    Dream Machine too. Wow! I almost feel not worthy it is so nice. I have my last three Brother Machines, and use them all. Know what you mean about the crowded sewing room. I did give my very first embroidery machine to a young girl that goes to my church. It is a Janome 9000 with a 4 x 4 sewing field, remember those first machines???? She is so excited about it, which makes me happy. I work, so have not been able to take any classes, but will try to work that in on Saturdays this summer. Thanks again for your
    site and sharing your sewing life with us. Mary

  6. Mary, you are SO lucky! The machine does so much I can hardly believe it. I thought I had a pretty good understanding of its capabilities until I started taking classes. I hope you get an opportunity to enroll in some. I’ve had each top-of-the line Brother since their very first PE-100 and for the past 5 years I have been handing them down to my 11 yo granddaughter, though the machines stay at my house. Now she declares that she can no longer sew on anything but the Dream. She says she is just spoiled now that she’s used it. I guess she is! The girl you gave your Janome to must be delighted. It’s wonderful for you to share with her. Keep me posted about your progress with the Dream.

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