Category Archives: Kids Sew

7 Year Old’s Quilt

She finished her quilt! She was so proud. It looked a lot better after it was laundered and quilt baste was washed away. But we were too eager to get the photo to wait.  She had to return home shortly after this image was taken.

“Nana, I want to make a quilt,” my 7 year old granddaughter announced last summer. This statement was no noble urge to learn the womanly art of quilting.  Make no mistake,  cold, hard cash was her motivation.

Vivian Rose had listened quietly at a family gathering as the women reminisced around the kitchen table about county fairs in the past and the huge sums that my daughter (Vivian’s mother) and Vivian’s older cousin had earned in premium pay outs.  Their quilts had been the most fun and earned the most prize money. Vivian  was dazzled and convinced this was indeed her road to riches.

I explained to her that making a quilt was a big commitment of time, especially with her living across the state.  We could not get together very often and we would have to work long hours in blocks of  time.  “I can do it,” she declared with determination.  And she did!

When sewing a with a child, it’s important to remember that it is HER (or HIS) project, not yours.  It is hard to simply suggest and not insist when it comes to making design decisions.

QUILT DESIGN

My quick and easy plan was for a 15 block quilt, 5 rows of 3 blocks.  Each block would be 8″ finished, seam allowances would be 1/2″.

NOTE: Of course, I did all the rotary cutting.  No child should handle a rotary cutter. She did, however, do the ironing, with supervision.

Eight 12″ blocks were cut from solid white fabric for machine embroidery and seven 10″ blocks were cut from the cat prints Vivian had chosen. Knowing her lifelong obsession with cats, I had a hefty stash of cat fabrics on hand and a Covid shopping prohibition.  We had to make do with what was on hand.

She selected her favorite 7 cat prints with no concern for color coordination. Next, she proceeded to select 8 redwork cat machine embroidery designs from Embroidery Library’s Crafty Cats Redwork Design Pack in the 5 x 7 size.  I’m so grateful for on-line shopping! The 12″ blocks allowed for easy hooping with water soluble stabilizer.

She had done a good bit of machine embroidery before this so she breezed through the redwork blocks. Here she is joining a block to cat fabric.

 

After embroidery, the blocks were trimmed to 9″ and were sewn into rows with the cat print blocks.  They, too, were trummed to 9″.  Then the rows joined together.  TIP:  After laying out the blocks in rows, we found it helpful to take a picture with my phone.  Then sewing them together made it easier to do so without mistakes. 

Vivi was very particular and most of her corners met almost perfectly. There was no sashing, as the seams were covered with jumbo rickrack.  It seemed almost a shame to cover them.

 

 

A glue stick helped hold the rick rack in place, pins added extra security and the laser on my Brother Dream Machine was a great aid in guiding her stitching.

 

 

After the rick rack was applied,  the backing was prepared.  It was 2″ wider and longer than the finished quilt top, prewashed and pressed.

A quit label was embroidered and stitched to the backing.

 

 

The batting was placed on a firm flat surface and sprayed with quilt baste.  The quilt top was smoothed over it.

The backing was placed face down to the quilt top and pinned securely on all sides.  It was stitched around all sides, leaving an 8″ opening at the bottom to turn the quilt right side out.

After it was turned, the opening seam allowance was folded  under and the edges pressed.  Rick rack was applied to the perimeter, sealing the opening and creating an outer border.

Carefully selected buttons were sewn by machine to each intersection and the ends of each length of rick rack.  They were secured in place with a glue stick.

TIP:  Just as when arranging the blocks before sewing,  the carefully selected buttons were photographed in place, section by section so they were visible as it was their time to be sewn in place.

 

She was just preparing to sew on buttons. I should have waited until she had sewn on a few. We had  repositioned the machine to the dining room so she had a big table to support the quilt but hadn’t  rotated it to be helpful.

 

Vivian learned so much while making this quilt, most importantly the satisfaction of a job well done, even though it took a long time, especially with  frequent canine interruptions.

 

 

And about that  plan that this quilt would be her road to riches?  That didn’t work out. Sadly, due to the pandemic, the county fair was cancelled for the first time since 1923.

She handled her disappointment very well.  I comforted her with news that now she had a great head start for next year, and now she has time to get more projects ready to enter.  So perhaps that road to riches beckons yet.  But there is more fun in the projects and the learning than the riches.  And more fun with Nana.  Yay!

Required disclaimer:  I am a paid Brother Brand Ambassador.  Not required:  I LOVE my Brother machines.

 

 

How-to: Garments for Ghana

Required disclosure:  I am a paid Brother Ambassador.  Not required:  I absolutely love Brother Machines.

Several readers have written asking if they may participate in the Garments for Ghana project.   Others asked how our project operated so they might do a similar event in their own community.  When I mentioned in response to a comment on this topic that I might write this post, at least one promised that she (sweet Sandee) would not find these details boring.  I hope she is not the only one because I am going ahead with this.

Before I began, I was given some direction from the mission team leaders.  The request was for bright colors, since the landscape there is pretty bleak.  We did that. Check.

Second, there must be no buttons or closures  that might break or need replacement. Such replacement is not an option for mothers in these areas.  Check.  Elastic at the neckline was the only closure notion.  I know elastic gives out after a couple of years, but I expect these garments will be worn out long  before the elastic is.

Third, in many African nations and apparently in Ghana, bare shoulders for girls and perhaps adult females, is taboo.  So we needed some sort of sleeve.  Check.  I did notice early on that many photos of pillowcase dresses for Little Dresses for Africa showed the girls wearing a  tee shirt under their dresses.  Now I see that the site offers a free pattern that has a sleeve, much like the pattern I used.

Fourth, each garment must be marked with its size.  I had a bag of labels for sizes 1-5 and for the others I embroidered sizes on grosgrain ribbon in the hoop.  Ladies who worked from home used a sharpie to write on ribbon, which like the others,  was tucked into the elastic casing at the back. Continue reading

Garments for Ghana

This is the first of 7 clotheslines that hung from the walls in fellowship hall.

Required disclaimer: I am a paid Brother Ambassador.  Not required:  I genuinely LOVE Brother machines.

UPDATE:  The first picture is in from Ghana!  Though this little girl is not needy, I think she is the daughter of Ghanese pastor who hosts the mission team.  Gayle had said this child would be given first choice.  She certainly looks pleased. Her father reported that she didn’t want to take off  the dress and slept in it!

 

What an exciting, satisfying project this has been!  Since the end of Feb. a group of ladies and 4 children of River City Church, EPC, have gathered every Thursday to sew for the needy children of Ghana. Our goal was to make 100 garments. We finished the last week in May with 76 dresses and 44 pairs of shorts!

Getting started with basic instructions.

 

Starting a pair of cargo shorts.

Our efforts were in support of this summer’s second medical mission trip to Ghana, led by a church member Dr. Lyle Wadsworth and his nurse wife Gayle.

NOTE:  Please excuse the wrinkled dresses.  The garments were pressed before being hung on the clothesline. But after being packed for shipment to Ghana, many were unpacked to be photographed.  It was just too time consuming to iron all of them.

Overturned yo-yo’s created puffy balloons. The teepee bag covers a runaway balloon.

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Sweet Dreams, Baby Girl

While spending the past weekend with our daughter and her family, we celebrated her birthday and her husband’s.  After running across this post, I decided to put it up again.  Daughters are wonderful!! (But so are sons.)

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Monogram is Dazzle from OESD. Tthe floral design is from Brother’s Holiday Card #77. This is a beautiful collection, with a pretty companion design for this one.

 

With a teary eye for the quick passage of time and a proud heart for the woman she has become, I celebrated my daughter’s birthday by making this pair of pillowcases for her.  With these and the wonderful life she has made for herself,  I expect she will have sweet dreams.

 

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The monogram is  Dazzle   from OESD.  It’s certainly convenient that she and her husband have the same initials.The floral design is from   Brother’s Holiday Card #77. This is a beautiful collection, with a pretty companion design for this one.

 

Luxurious bed linens have always been a priority for my girl.  As a freshman moving into a dorm at University of Florida, she asked me to custom make pima cotton sheets for the non-standard dorm bed, and, of course, matching pillowcases.    She confided that she was a bit like storybook character in the Princess and the Pea.  How could she get a decent night’s sleep on anything but pima cotton?  Oh dear, I thought.  Have I raised a “pima” donna?   But of course, two sets of fitted pima sheets were packed.

 

Sending off our French foregin exchange student days before Rebecca (in red) headed to University of Florida.

At  the airport, sending Claire, our French foreign exchange student,  home to France.  This was just a few days before Rebecca (in red) headed to University of Florida—along with her mama-made pima cotton bedding.

 

From the dormitory to the sorority house to her first college-girl apartment to her first little bachelorette house and now in her lovely marital home, she has always had pima cotton bedding. Continue reading

“Nobody Knows the Trouble I’ve Seen” & the Good Times I’ve Had

Dear Friends and Readers, once again I am back.   My absence is well expressed by Sam Cooke who seems to know my pain.  Nobody knows the computer trouble I’ve seen!

For the past several weeks, my computer has been crazy, only occasionally and unpredictably usable.  I felt mute.  On my i-phone and Kindle, my fingers just bumble around the tiny keyboards and I grow frustrated very quickly.  I NEED my pc.

After running every virus checker, malware and spyware program known to the high-tech internet world, my fabulous tech savvy husband wiped the hard drive clean and reinstalled every single program.  And at last, it seems that all is well.

But amidst all this aggravation, we’ve had some really good times and I’ve done some sewing.  For a very special bridal shower I embroidered 46 dishtowels for guest favors.  I’ve known the groom-to-be since before he was born and this 35 yo fella has always had a special place in my heart.   So now that he has found the love of his life, the wedding is a major event for us. Continue reading

Kid Sew Monogrammed Scarf

R quattro 2xx

 

Our 11 yo grandson, Robert, gets such a kick out of machine embroidery.  He is very, very savvy about technology so my Brother embroidery machines fascinate him.

 

R quattro 3a xx

 

Recently, he monogrammed a polar fleece scarf for his mother, thoroughly enjoying the process of selecting, setting up and transferring the design to the machine.  Curious about the need for water soluble stabilizer on top, about why  we don’t hoop polar fleece, about how the machine knows which hoop is in place, etc. etc. etc.

He even made some design decisions, choosing to alternate the fill and outline colors between each letter.

R finished scarfxx

 

But he really wants to know just how the machine does what it does.  I just tell him to be grateful for its capabilities and DO NOT TRY TO TAKE IT APART!!!  If he tries, I threaten that I will cut his hair while he sleeps.  I almost wish he would make an attempt so I could shear those blond locks.

For the Boys

He asked that his face not be included. That's a shame because he is so handsome. But I respect his privacy.

Grandson Robert, 10 yo, embroidered this fleece poncho on my Brother Dream Machine.

 

Shops, internet and sewing groups inundate us with beautiful and adorable projects for our girls.  Items for the boys appear far less frequently. Yet we want to shower them with the same love that is stitched into items made for our girls.

My friend Judy Day faithfully and thoughtfully includes something for her grandson in packages she sends with garments for her granddaughter. See one example in her Even Steven post.

When our delightful 10 yo grandson Robert spent the night recently, he spent a lot of time cuddled up on the couch, wrapped in a fleece throw.  March Madness was well underway, watched intently by Robert and his Granddad.

As Robert trekked into the kitchen for a drink refill, with his blanket dragging the floor and slipping off his shoulders,  Sonia Showalter’s poncho   came to mind.  That’s just what Robert needed!

He agreed it was a great idea and wanted to help.  The technology of my Dream Machine fascinates him and he always asks a lot of questions about its capabilities.  In my experience, kids love sewing machines.  Robert chose a dragon from the built-in designs.

 

R dream dragon

 

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Thanksgiving Fun v.’14

3 towels ed

Brown gingham checks (not black, as it appears) border the towels, embroidered by 10 yo granddaughter, Laurel. The towels are from All About Blanks, my favorite on-line source for blanks.

 

Another Thanksgiving has come and gone and I hope it was your best one yet.  We all have so much for which to be thankful.  No matter what our circumstances, we all can look around our town, our country and around the world to see others so much less fortunate.  So we Americans celebrate our many blessings with family and friends, around  a table heavy laden with favorite holiday food.

 

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Norman Rockwell captured the spirit of the day in this 1946 picture.

 

Some celebrate in the traditional manner, as shown above.  Others dine in a more contemporary style, as shown below.

 

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Someone else captured another way to celebrate Thanksgiving.

 

Either way, most of us celebrate our good fortune. Continue reading

Summer Fun Sewing

flower top

 

 

Busy, busy, busy!  What ever happened to the “lazy, hazy,  crazy days of summer?”  Is that another thing of the past?  We’ve had crazy but no hazy or lazy.

In addition to lots of sewing, I’ve enjoyed  two weeks at our cabin in the mountains of North Carolina, one  week with our daughter, sweet Alastair and whirling dervish Vivian Rose, as well as one week with Bob. What great getaways from Florida’s hot summer!

This floral top was made for dgd Laurel, 10.  The quick and easy commercial pattern lent itself to a variety of embellishments.  In addition to piping and rick rack,  crocheted flowers  purchased from  Farmhouse Fabrics were added into the mix.

 

floral top crochet

 

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Kid $ewing

 

My 9 year old granddaughter continues to expand the product line for her little business, Laurel’s Specialty Sewing.  After introducing monogrammed tote bags, she added the service of sewing Girl Scout patches on the vests of her fellow Scouts ($ .50 per patch, monofilament thread, free motion sewing).  This product and service has proven to be very profitable.  She recently bought an American Girl doll with money she earned.

Now Laurel is promoting a new item in her line.  The simple felt hangings are destined for the upcoming Girl Scout Camporee.  The girls bring little items to trade, momentos of the event or trinkets, such as  these for an event they call SWAPS–Special Whatchamacallits Affectionately Pinned Somewhere.

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