Coming Home Outfit~Daygown

 

Alastair, 2 1/2 months, on antique carriage cover.  He had nearly outgrown this daygown, but this was the first time that the harried new parents got around to taking a picture for me.  It DID fit when he came home, but at 9 lb.s 6 oz. it didn't fit very long!

Alastair, 2 1/2 months, on antique carriage cover. He had nearly outgrown this daygown, but this was the first time that the harried new parents got around to taking a picture for me. It DID fit when he came home, but at 9 lb.s 6 oz. it didn’t fit very long!

One of the first things I made for Alastair’s layette was his coming home outfit. The daygown was made from Maggie’s Classics Daygown #113 pattern. The matching blanket was featured in a previous post and the sweet little cap will be shown soon.

Obviously, this picture was taken lonnnnnng after he came home from the hospital. He was 2 ½ months old and the gown is ridiculously short. When he was newborn, the length was adequate if not generous.  But were I to make another, I would make it much longer. You can see that it still fits him except for the length. But if it had been cut longer, he could have worn it much longer.

Like his cousins (Laurel, 10 lbs. 0 oz. and Robert, 10 lbs. 0 oz.) Alastair was a very large baby at 9 lbs. 6 oz., 22″.   In fact, he was 3 weeks overdue and had lost weight in the womb.  So the fact that at 2 ½ months it still fit across the chest and shoulders is an indicator that the gown itself does not run small.

This was the first picture we have of him in it, taken for my benefit. I find the asymmetry of the front opening and the bias binding to be a very pleasing combination. Made from white Swiss flannel, the daygown front is bound with lightweight blue Swiss batiste, from the hem, around the neckline and down to the hem on the other side. The sleeves are also bound.

 

cominghomeApocketbrite

 

The little pocket is a charming break in the plain expanse of the simple front. It sports a shadow embroidered bluebird which looks lovely up close, but is lost (at least the bird’s chest) in the photo. The pocket is further embellished along the top with three tiny pearl buttons, attached with blue thread. Matching 80 wt. Madeira Cotona blue thread is used for the pinstitch that attaches the pocket to the gown.

 

cominghomeAbackbrite

 

At the center back, an inverted pleat adds fullness. That, too, is pinstitched in place. A row of hand worked feather stitching is worked down the center between the two rows of pinstitch.

I decided that while it was rather late in my sewing career to be learning to work  a decent featherstitch, late was better than never.  So these pitiful little stitches add color but little graceful symmetry. Of course, with my appreciation for asymmetry, perhaps I didn’t try hard enough. But since making this daygown and the matching cap, I have continued to improve this skill and now can execute an acceptable but not lovely feather stitch.

Martha Pullen once said that if something is worth doing, it is worth doing poorly until you get good at it. I think that is good advice. As I strive to elevate the quality of my featherstitching from acceptable to good, I think it is going to be a long term effort.

This is my post for White Wednesday.

3 responses to “Coming Home Outfit~Daygown

  1. He was a cute little baby!

  2. Hello, I love the outfit, but im afraid that my son inlaw would feel that it is more female, than male looking… I agree long ago, the boys wore gowns, and that was fine then… ? But I do love it, and it is just what ive been looking for… Could u make it into a pants and shirt outfit instead? with the cap and blanket? And how much would this cost? Please let me know… Thank you.
    Michele Williams

  3. Michele, this outfit was made for my grandson’s homecoming and is not for sale. I’m sorry I can’t help you with this.

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