Category Archives: bags

Penguin Pack

How cute is this?  Jo made this back pack for her kindergartner and he loves it.  But what little guy wouldn’t!

Jo says, “The pattern is from the book, Little Things to Sew, by Oliver + S.  The pattern is written very well and it wasn’t hard to sew.  I did have to order the zipper and the strap adjuster online because I couldn’t find them anywhere locally.  

The grey fabric is I’m-not-sure-something-bottom-weight-possibly-in-the-wool-family.  The yellow and light blue are both from  fat quarters.  I just about danced out of the store when I found the penguin fabric!  Continue reading

New Mother Gift

 

 

 

 

 

This sweet new mother gift set was photographed and sent to me by one of my friends in Puerto Rico, Haydee.  Several previous posts on this blog have shown her work or ideas.   As I have explained before, the language barrier prevents me from scoping out the details of these projects. Continue reading

Make a Girl’s Pouch Purse

When Laurel and Robert arrived for a two day visit,  my little granddaughter was wearing the ladybug dress I made recently. While she was here, we made a matching “purse.”

This  is a nice little sewing project for a child, as the purse foundation can be a ready made handkerchief requiring just 4 lines of straight stitch to be finished.   Or it can be more elaborate, like a square with lace edging or bias binding and machine embroidery.  Note:  I attached the bias binding but Laurel did  the remainder of the sewing.

Regardless of your choice, you begin with a finished square.  Large squares make large purses, smaller squares make smaller purses.  Nothing tricky here. Continue reading

1st Communion Accessories

This is a continuation of the previous post about the exquisite First Communion dress Judy Day made for her granddaughter Courtney. Details of the dress, slip and veil were included  there while this post focuses on the extensive accessories–Bible cover, garment bag, hanger and purse–that make the ensemble  all the more special.  In Judy’s  words:

My parents, Courtney’s paternal  great grandparents, gave her the First Communion Bible. It was smocked and beaded by my mother, Wanda Stewart,  in  the same diamond pattern as the dress.  The beaded cross on the Bible was formed by sewing the pearl glass beads  in place  after the smocking was completed.  The instructions for the Bible cover can be found in the April, 2007 issue of Creative Needle  magazine.  Continue reading

Party Sewing

Note the ever popular Happy Birthday tablecloth. Several years ago I made 3 or 4 of these. They have been through more parties than Thomas has been through tunnels.

The birthday boy chugs a cold one as he admires his birthday balloons.

Alastair’s Two-toot birthday party was a big hit with the children and as well as the adults.  The cupcake train delighted everyone and was so easy to make.  Typical of Florida spring, the sun shone brightly and a gulf coast breeze kept everyone comfortable.

 

My daughter Rebecca and I made the cupcakes and built the train cars the night before the party.  A Thomas train engine  pulled flatbed cars loaded with cupcakes.

The train cars were  built with a stack of two graham crackers with buttercream frosting holding them firmly together. 

Other graham crackers were  broken into “sticks” and stacked three high for the axels, with mini Oreo wheels.  Gum drops served as hitches between the cars.

We all enjoyed watching 2 1/2 year old Ethan surreptitiously pull an Oreo wheel from the train and pop it into his mouth.  His mother scolded, but  Rebecca assured her that the flatbed cars were there for the children to enjoy, just like  the cupcakes and their teepee train bags.  Continue reading

Two-toot!

 

zTwoTootbag

 

Sewing for Alastair’s upcoming second birthday party is such fun.  I’ve only just begun and I am glad to have another week  to sew for this gala affair.

 

ztwotootbag2

 

A  few of the “boy” teepee goodie bag favors are sewn up and I am working on the girl version in more feminine colors.

As usual, a simple little project turned into something more time consuming.  I chose the  pillow ticking fabric because it reminds me of  traditional engineer bib overalls, worn by little guys (and train engineers)  for ages.  Until he was six, our son  had a new pair every year because he wore them out as he explored every inch of  our three acres, climbing trees and digging  “forts” under the cascading bridal wreath spirea by the clothesline.    It makes me grin every time I see Alastair wearing this same garb, 35 years later.

For the festivities, Alastair will be wearing his overalls  along with a matching cap, both of which I plan to embroider with “Amtrak.”   There is also a red bandana to tie around his neck, but we’re not sure he is going to be enthusiastic about that. Continue reading

Sewing Bag

 

Note the shading on the tree trunk.

This is the most incredibly beautiful bag I have ever seen.  It was displayed at the fashion show at Sewing at the Beach in Myrtle Beach a few weeks ago. 

It was a class project somewhere in the South–I’m sorry I didn’t get the details.  But I do know they met weekly for some time and learned a new technique at each class.  That technique, then, was applied to a section of the bag.  After a number of weeks, the bag was complete. 

The design, workmanship and detail are just breathtaking, and more so in person than these woefully inadequate pictures can convey.

The topiary to the right of the front door features a variety of silk ribbon embroidery stitches.  The life-like climbing roses over the door and across the front of the house motivated me to feed my climbers this week. 

And just look at that basket of flowers!  Oh, my!  And in each window is a little rabbit, carefully selected and cut from novelty fabric.  Benny the Bunny Butler, a button cottontail, sits at the front door, ready to greet guests.  Surely, a responsible party is monitoring these hares or all the blossoms would be gnawed to the ground.

The details around the tree are intriguing, from the community of bird houses to a garden art angel to a bee hive on the ground.  A tiny button bird is perched in the tree, undoubtedly singing a glorious springtime  tune.

Just beyond the house on the right side a guest is arriving, most likely for a quilting bee.  Beneath a three dimensional straw hat, a her braid swings as she scurries through the butterflies fluttering in the air.  The elaborately embroidered and beaded bag over her arm carries a thimble.  At her feet rests a large tote, equal to the thimble bag in glorious, meticulous embroidery.  It must be heavy with a  charm squares to trade and a quilt top ready for her tiny 12-to-the-inch stitches. And probably a bag of chocolates in a zip lock. Continue reading

Pyramid Bag for Jr. Archeologist

pyramid bag with miniature sphinx embroidery

Robert, 5, absolutely loves the Playmobil pyramid he got for Christmas.  His mother, however, has bemoaned the fact that it has more pieces/parts than the Eiffel Tower.  Each panel can be removed to reveal hidden chambers, staircases, trap doors,  tombs, servants, and more.

How well I remember helping Robert’s father, our son Ryan, search the house for the many pieces to his Fisher-Price farm and two story garage.  With that memory and the ease of making a standard teepee bag, I stitched this up in a hurry for my precious grandson.  So this bag, made from the basic teepee bag pattern,  now holds the sarcophagus and treasures of his pyramid.

Actually, I had made ponchos for Laurel and her doll and needed something for Robert.  It was late when I finished the ponchos and I wanted to shut down my sewing room and go to bed.  But duty called. I needed to make something in a hurry for Robert, so the bag came to mind at once. Of course, it’s pyramid shape seemed especially appropriate for Robert. Continue reading

Dance Bag

One of Laurel’s Christmas gifts was this new dance bag.  Almost three years ago, I embroidered a sweet pink bag with pastel ballerinas.  Dirty and stained, it apparently has long since passed its expiration date.

Laurel’s 6 year old taste has gone over to the wild side, likely the result of glitzy marketing that targets her age group.  Though I prefer the look and mood of the old bag,  I have to remind myself  that I am sewing for Laurel.

The shiny, new, waterproof, black bag  should be impervious to stains, like the huge red blotch brought on by a leaking bottle of  Gatorade that she planned to finish after dance class.

Continue reading

Margaret Tully Sews

This past weekend Margaret Tully taught a class at the Sewing Garret in South Daytona.  As always, she was delightfully entertaining while she teaching her students fabulous techniques and tips.

I was unable to stay for the sit and sew portion, but snapped these pictures of some of her inspiring samples.

Margaret is best known for her serging expertise, but she is equally adept with sewing.  The creativity and variety of her samples shows just how diverse her talents are. Continue reading